October 1990
Volume 31, Issue 10
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Articles  |   October 1990
Loss of stromal glycosaminoglycans during corneal edema.
Author Affiliations
  • T A Kangas
    Department of Physiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.
  • H F Edelhauser
    Department of Physiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.
  • S S Twining
    Department of Physiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.
  • W J O'Brien
    Department of Physiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science October 1990, Vol.31, 1994-2002. doi:
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      T A Kangas, H F Edelhauser, S S Twining, W J O'Brien; Loss of stromal glycosaminoglycans during corneal edema.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1990;31(10):1994-2002.

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Abstract

This study tried to determine if glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are released from the rabbit stroma during corneal edema. The GAGs of rabbit corneas were labeled in situ using anterior-chamber injections of 35S-sulfate and 3H-glucosamine. Labeled corneal pairs were excised and the endothelium perfused in vitro in the specular microscope. Edema was induced in one cornea by perfusion with a calcium-free balanced salt solution; the control cornea was perfused with glutathione bicarbonate Ringer's (GBR). Corneal thickness was measured every 15 minutes during the 3-hour perfusion period, and perfusate fractions were collected from each cornea and analyzed for the presence of GAGs. Edematous corneas swelled from 438 +/- 14.8 microns to 688 +/- 10.6 microns compared with control corneas (427 +/- 4.7 microns to 454 +/- 7.2 microns). Total 3H-glucosamine (4.00 +/- 0.68%) and 35S-sulfate (10.36 +/- 0.92%) released from the edematous corneas during perfusion exceeded that lost by control corneas (1.92 +/- 0.18% for 3H-glucosamine; 3.23 +/- 0.52% for 35S-sulfate). Enzymatic digestion studies showed the presence of keratan sulfate in the edematous perfusates. The results suggest that increased loss of radiolabeled components from edematous corneas represent a loss of stromal GAGs and possibly GAG fragments. Therefore, corneal edema involves loss of GAGs and water uptake.

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