March 1992
Volume 33, Issue 3
Free
Articles  |   March 1992
Cultures of human retinal pigment epithelium. Modulation of extracellular matrix.
Author Affiliations
  • B Martini
    Department of Ophthalmology (Doheny Eye Institute), University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles 90033.
  • R Pandey
    Department of Ophthalmology (Doheny Eye Institute), University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles 90033.
  • T E Ogden
    Department of Ophthalmology (Doheny Eye Institute), University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles 90033.
  • S J Ryan
    Department of Ophthalmology (Doheny Eye Institute), University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles 90033.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science March 1992, Vol.33, 516-521. doi:
  • Views
  • PDF
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      B Martini, R Pandey, T E Ogden, S J Ryan; Cultures of human retinal pigment epithelium. Modulation of extracellular matrix.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1992;33(3):516-521.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

The extracellular matrix of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is an important component of the fibroelastic membranes formed in proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). These membranes consist of cells intermingled with fibrillar proteins, such as elastin and collagen. Because RPE cells may be exposed to vitreous and serum-derived factors in conditions that lead to PVR, the effects of vitreous and serum on the deposition of fibrillar proteins by RPE cells were studied using radioactive labeling and indirect immunofluorescence techniques. The RPE cells, modulated by combined vitreous and serum into a fibrocytic-like appearance, deposited less fibroelastic proteins per cell. However, as a result of simultaneous cell proliferation, the total deposition of fibroelastic proteins per culture was increased. Indirect immunofluorescence studies suggest that it is type I collagen that is altered in the matrix of these modulated cell cultures. This information is important in pathologic conditions characterized by intraocular cell proliferation and fibroelastic membrane formation; these phenomena are seen in many vitreoproliferative disorders.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×