September 1992
Volume 33, Issue 10
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Articles  |   September 1992
Correlations between laser flare measurements and anterior chamber protein concentrations.
Author Affiliations
  • S M Shah
    Medical Eye Unit, St. Thomas' Hospital, London, England, UK.
  • D J Spalton
    Medical Eye Unit, St. Thomas' Hospital, London, England, UK.
  • J C Taylor
    Medical Eye Unit, St. Thomas' Hospital, London, England, UK.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 1992, Vol.33, 2878-2884. doi:
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      S M Shah, D J Spalton, J C Taylor; Correlations between laser flare measurements and anterior chamber protein concentrations.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1992;33(10):2878-2884.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

The laser flare cell meter quantifies anterior chamber (AC) protein (flare) by measuring light scattering of a helium-neon laser beam in the AC. The relationship between photon count and protein concentration both in vitro and in vivo was assessed. The reproducibility of the in vitro photon count measurements was 7.3%. There was a significant linear relationship between photon count and the concentration of both albumin (r = 1.0, P = 0.0001) and immunoglobulin G (IgG, r = 0.99, P = 0.0001) in vitro, but the linear-regression formulas were different with greater light scattering by IgG than by albumin at the same concentration. Laser flare measurements were done on 22 patients (12 normal eyes, 5 eyes with Fuchs' heterochromic cyclitis, and 5 uveitic eyes) before cataract surgery. Aqueous humor obtained from these patients by paracentesis was analyzed for total protein, albumin, and IgG concentration. There was a significant linear relationship (r = 0.88, P = 0.0001) between the laser flare value (range, 5.8-107.8 photons/msec) and the total aqueous protein concentration (range, 14-388 mg/dl). Use of an in vitro albumin calibration curve to convert photon count into protein concentration was found to overestimate the actual protein concentration. This overestimation was slight in normal eyes and increased with increased blood-aqueous barrier breakdown. The use of such a calibration curve therefore is not appropriate in studies on diseased eyes. The authors recommended that laser flare results be expressed in either photons per milliseconds or converted into an equivalent protein concentration using a calibration curve based on actual AC protein measurements.

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