September 1992
Volume 33, Issue 10
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Articles  |   September 1992
Intravenous nicardipine in cats increases optic nerve head but not retinal blood flow.
Author Affiliations
  • S Harino
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.
  • C E Riva
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.
  • B L Petrig
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 1992, Vol.33, 2885-2890. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      S Harino, C E Riva, B L Petrig; Intravenous nicardipine in cats increases optic nerve head but not retinal blood flow.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1992;33(10):2885-2890.

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Abstract

The effect of intravenously injected nicardipine on retinal and optic nerve head (ONH) blood flow was studied in 27 cats using laser Doppler velocimetry and flowmetry, respectively. A dose of 20 micrograms/kg of nicardipine had little effect on retinal blood flow. A dose of 100 micrograms/kg, however, produced a significant transient decrease in flow. By contrast, both doses produced a significant increase in ONH blood flow despite a significant decrease of the mean arterial blood pressure. Measurements of the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) with an oxygen-sensitive microelectrode, whose tip was placed in the vitreous just in front of the optic disc, showed a significant increase in the PO2 that paralleled the increase in ONH blood flow. These results demonstrate, for the first time to the authors' knowledge, a pharmacologically induced increase in ONH blood flow and suggest that nicardipine could have a beneficial effect on ONH tissue.

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