October 1993
Volume 34, Issue 11
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Articles  |   October 1993
A comparison of the laser flare cell meter and fluorophotometry in assessment of the blood-aqueous barrier.
Author Affiliations
  • S M Shah
    Medical Eye Unit, St. Thomas' Hospital, London, England.
  • D J Spalton
    Medical Eye Unit, St. Thomas' Hospital, London, England.
  • R J Allen
    Medical Eye Unit, St. Thomas' Hospital, London, England.
  • S E Smith
    Medical Eye Unit, St. Thomas' Hospital, London, England.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science October 1993, Vol.34, 3124-3130. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      S M Shah, D J Spalton, R J Allen, S E Smith; A comparison of the laser flare cell meter and fluorophotometry in assessment of the blood-aqueous barrier.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1993;34(11):3124-3130.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To evaluate and compare the use of the Kowa laser flare cell meter and intravenous anterior chamber fluorophotometry in assessment of the blood-aqueous barrier after cataract surgery. METHOD: Laser flare and cell measurements and fluorophotometry were performed at 1 and 3 months after surgery in 48 eyes of 44 patients admitted for routine cataract surgery. The fellow pseudophakic eyes of these patients were used as controls. RESULTS: The two techniques measure different parameters, but both methods are able to document the integrity or breakdown of the blood-aqueous barrier. However, the laser flare cell meter is more sensitive in quantifying subtle changes in barrier function to large molecules (proteins). Various methods of assessing anterior chamber fluorophotometry data were also compared. Measurement of a diffusion coefficient (requiring the measurement of plasma fluorescence) was not found to be more sensitive than other methods and did not alter the clinical significance of data obtained from the measurement of anterior chamber fluorescence alone. CONCLUSIONS: Both the laser flare cell meter and fluorophotometry provide a method for the assessment of the postoperative blood-aqueous barrier. However, the laser flare cell meter is rapid, noninvasive, and relatively easier to use. Therefore, for clinical use, it has great practical advantages over fluorophotometry.

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