May 1992
Volume 33, Issue 6
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Articles  |   May 1992
Retinal adhesive force in living rabbit, cat, and monkey eyes. Normative data and enhancement by mannitol and acetazolamide.
Author Affiliations
  • M Kita
    Department of Ophthalmology, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305.
  • M F Marmor
    Department of Ophthalmology, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 1992, Vol.33, 1879-1882. doi:
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      M Kita, M F Marmor; Retinal adhesive force in living rabbit, cat, and monkey eyes. Normative data and enhancement by mannitol and acetazolamide.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1992;33(6):1879-1882.

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Abstract

Small retinal detachments (blebs) were made in living eyes by injecting balanced salt solution into the subretinal space with a micropipette. A second micropipette, inserted into the same bleb, measured subretinal pressure using a resistance servonulling system. The adhesive force was calculated from the pressure difference across the retina according to Laplace's law. The retinal adhesive force in rabbit, cat, and monkey eyes averaged 1.0, 1.8, and 1.4 x 10(2) dyne/cm, respectively. In rabbit eyes, 2 hr after intravenous administration of 15 mg/kg acetazolamide, the retinal adhesive force was increased to 133%. In monkeys, this dose of acetazolamide increased retinal adhesion to 144% of control values. Mannitol (2 g/kg) increased retinal adhesion in the monkey to 153% of control values 90 min after intravenous injection (compared with an increase of 145% in previous experiments in the rabbit). Because both mannitol and acetazolamide enhance retinal adhesiveness in living primate eyes, it seems likely that they will have a similar effect in humans that they may be clinically useful.

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