May 1992
Volume 33, Issue 6
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Articles  |   May 1992
Effects on retinal adhesive force in vivo of metabolically active agents in the subretinal space.
Author Affiliations
  • M Kita
    Department of Ophthalmology, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305.
  • M F Marmor
    Department of Ophthalmology, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 1992, Vol.33, 1883-1887. doi:
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      M Kita, M F Marmor; Effects on retinal adhesive force in vivo of metabolically active agents in the subretinal space.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1992;33(6):1883-1887.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

The in vivo effects on the retinal adhesive force of injecting metabolically active agents into the subretinal space of rabbits were studied. Small retinal detachments (blebs) were made in living Dutch rabbit eyes by injecting experimental solutions into the subretinal space with a micropipette. A second micropipette, inserted into the same bleb, measured fluid pressure using a resistance servonulling system. The adhesive force was calculated according to Laplace's law. Blebs containing dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate, furosemide, and amiloride showed retinal adhesiveness to be decreased to 69%, 86%, and 81% of control values, respectively. Dibutyryl cyclic guanosine monophosphate and acetazolamide had no significant effect. Ouabain increased retinal adhesiveness to 119% of normal. The nonspecific metabolic toxin, dinitrophenol, reduced adhesiveness to an unmeasurable level. For some agents, the rate at which subretinal fluid was absorbed also was measured. Furosemide and amiloride in the subretinal space caused slight slowing of subretinal fluid absorption; acetazolamide had no effect. These data support the concept that metabolic factors contribute to retinal adhesion in vivo.

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