January 1992
Volume 33, Issue 1
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Articles  |   January 1992
Vascular permeability during the early and late phases of ocular anaphylaxis.
Author Affiliations
  • M Calonge
    Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
  • B Ng
    Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
  • M R Allansmith
    Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
  • K J Bloch
    Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science January 1992, Vol.33, 55-59. doi:
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      M Calonge, B Ng, M R Allansmith, K J Bloch; Vascular permeability during the early and late phases of ocular anaphylaxis.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1992;33(1):55-59.

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Abstract

The role of enhanced vascular permeability in a model of ocular anaphylaxis was investigated during both early- and late-phase reactions (EPR and LPR). Vascular permeability was assessed by measuring the extravascular retention of 125I-bovine serum albumin (125I-BSA) in ocular tissues. Ten groups of guinea pigs (n = 5-12 per group) were injected with dinitrophenylated (DNP) bovine gamma globulin emulsified in Freund's adjuvants and challenged after a 4-week interval by topical application of di-DNP-lysine to one eye and phosphate-buffered saline to the other eye. Thereafter, the eyes were examined and the animals were killed at different intervals after topical challenge. They were injected intravenously with 125I-BSA 0.5 hr before death. Retained radioactivity was measured separately in four tissues. The EPR (period between 0.5-1.5 hr after challenge) was characterized by enhanced retention of radioactivity in lids, conjunctiva, and orbital content. There was no significant retention of extravascular radioactivity in the globe and lacrimal gland. Thereafter (period between 2-3.5 hr after challenge), retained radioactivity was significantly diminished. The subsequent period, between 4.5-6.5 hr (LPR), was characterized by a smaller, although significant, increment of radioactivity retained in lids and conjunctiva but not in the other tissues examined. These findings indicate that enhanced microvascular permeability occurs during two phases in actively immunized guinea pigs challenged topically with di-DNP-lysine and that these phases correspond to the clinical signs that constitute the EPR and LPR of ocular anaphylaxis.

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