November 1993
Volume 34, Issue 12
Free
Articles  |   November 1993
Transplantation of Y79 cells into rat eyes: an in vivo model of human retinoblastomas.
Author Affiliations
  • M del Cerro
    Department of Neurobiology, University of Rochester School of Medicine, NY 14642.
  • G M Seigel
    Department of Neurobiology, University of Rochester School of Medicine, NY 14642.
  • E Lazar
    Department of Neurobiology, University of Rochester School of Medicine, NY 14642.
  • D Grover
    Department of Neurobiology, University of Rochester School of Medicine, NY 14642.
  • C del Cerro
    Department of Neurobiology, University of Rochester School of Medicine, NY 14642.
  • D H Brooks
    Department of Neurobiology, University of Rochester School of Medicine, NY 14642.
  • D DiLoreto, Jr
    Department of Neurobiology, University of Rochester School of Medicine, NY 14642.
  • G Chader
    Department of Neurobiology, University of Rochester School of Medicine, NY 14642.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science November 1993, Vol.34, 3336-3346. doi:
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      M del Cerro, G M Seigel, E Lazar, D Grover, C del Cerro, D H Brooks, D DiLoreto, G Chader; Transplantation of Y79 cells into rat eyes: an in vivo model of human retinoblastomas.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1993;34(12):3336-3346.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To develop an in vivo model of human retinoblastoma by returning cultured Y79 retinoblastoma cells to the retinal environment of a widely available laboratory animal. In so doing, to study the survival, integration, and invasive characteristics expressed by tumoral cells grafted into an intraocular milieu from which these progenitor cells originated more than 20 years ago. METHODS: Using the retinal grafting method of Lazar and del Cerro, Y79 cells were injected under direct visualization into the subretinal space of Fischer 344 rats. The host rats included 36 animals that received daily injections of cyclosporin A and 4 that did not. All hosts were sacrificed 30 to 60 days after transplantation. RESULTS: Clinical examination showed vitreal invasion by masses of flocculent white material or the intravitreal formation of solid tumors. Histologic examination showed these formations to be outgrowths of grafted tumoral cells into the host retina and vitreal cavity. Highly anaplastic tumoral cells were also found lodged in subretinal and intraretinal locations. There were signs of continued and intense cell division within the grafts, with no indication of cell-mediated host reaction against the grafted cells. CONCLUSIONS: After intraretinal xenografting, human Y79 retinoblastoma cells retain a highly tumoral nature despite many years of in vitro propagation. When xenografted, these cells survive, grow, and express their malignancy within the retina of the common laboratory rat protected by a moderate immunosuppressive regimen. This partial immunosuppression is a requirement for the xenografts to prosper. This model offers a valuable opportunity to study in vivo the cellular and molecular biology of this and other human retinoblastomas, and it may facilitate the evaluation of antitumoral treatments.

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