December 1993
Volume 34, Issue 13
Free
Articles  |   December 1993
Variability of the main sequence.
Author Affiliations
  • E Bollen
    Department of Neurology, University Hospital, Leiden, The Netherlands.
  • J Bax
    Department of Neurology, University Hospital, Leiden, The Netherlands.
  • J G van Dijk
    Department of Neurology, University Hospital, Leiden, The Netherlands.
  • M Koning
    Department of Neurology, University Hospital, Leiden, The Netherlands.
  • J E Bos
    Department of Neurology, University Hospital, Leiden, The Netherlands.
  • C G Kramer
    Department of Neurology, University Hospital, Leiden, The Netherlands.
  • E A van der Velde
    Department of Neurology, University Hospital, Leiden, The Netherlands.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science December 1993, Vol.34, 3700-3704. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      E Bollen, J Bax, J G van Dijk, M Koning, J E Bos, C G Kramer, E A van der Velde; Variability of the main sequence.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1993;34(13):3700-3704.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: This study investigated the relationship between amplitude and peak velocity of saccadic eye movements (the so-called main sequence) and the intra-individual variability of the main sequence. METHODS: Saccadic amplitudes and peak velocities were measured twice in 58 healthy subjects with an infrared reflection technique. RESULTS: Considerable intra-individual variability was found between the first and second recordings. CONCLUSIONS: Intra-individual variability of saccadic peak velocity affects the interpretation of changes in repeated recordings of peak velocities, such as before and after medication is administered. Furthermore, considerable intra-individual variability decreases the probability that statistically significant differences between patients and control subjects can be detected, especially when groups are small. Calculating the intraclass correlation coefficient allows the number of subjects in comparative studies to be determined.

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