July 1996
Volume 37, Issue 8
Free
Articles  |   July 1996
Acuity and contrast sensitivity in monkeys after neonatal intraocular lens implantation with and without part-time occlusion of the fellow eye.
Author Affiliations
  • R G Boothe
    Division of Visual Science, Yerkes Regional Primate Research Center, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, USA.
  • T M Louden
    Division of Visual Science, Yerkes Regional Primate Research Center, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, USA.
  • S R Lambert
    Division of Visual Science, Yerkes Regional Primate Research Center, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, USA.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 1996, Vol.37, 1520-1531. doi:
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      R G Boothe, T M Louden, S R Lambert; Acuity and contrast sensitivity in monkeys after neonatal intraocular lens implantation with and without part-time occlusion of the fellow eye.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1996;37(8):1520-1531.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: The authors used a monkey model to evaluate intraocular lenses (IOLs) for the treatment of infantile cataract in humans. Specifically, they sought to assess the effectiveness of IOLs, with and without occlusion therapy, in preventing amblyopia. METHODS: A diffuser contact lens was placed on one eye each of 11 neonatal monkeys to simulate an infantile cataract. A unilateral lensectomy, combined with the implantation of an IOL, was performed on the same eye 1 to 2 weeks after birth. Clear contact lenses were used to adjust the optical correction of the pseudophakic eyes to a near point, and opaque lenses were used to maintain daily part-time (70%) occlusion of the fellow eyes of half the subjects. Behavioral methods were used to assess grating acuity, optotype acuity (Landolt C), and contrast sensitivity. RESULTS: In five of the animals, complications that developed in the eye with the implant were severe enough to interfere with visual function. The authors present only behavioral outcomes obtained before or in the absence of surgical complications. In monkeys that underwent daily 70% occlusion, grating acuity in the pseudophakic eyes eventually matured to normal adult levels. Grating acuity was significantly poorer in animals with no occlusion therapy. Even in animals with normal grating acuity, assessments of optotype acuity revealed amblyopic deficits; contrast sensitivity was impaired as well at middle and low spatial frequencies. CONCLUSIONS: The current study demonstrates that if there are no complications secondary to surgery, normal grating acuity can be obtained in neonatal monkey eyes that undergo IOL implantation, optical correction of the pseudophakic eye to a near point, and 70% occlusion of the fellow eye. However, these good outcomes for grating acuity cannot be attained without occlusion therapy. In addition, optotype acuity and sensitivity to contrast always are impaired.

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