July 1996
Volume 37, Issue 8
Free
Articles  |   July 1996
Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging confirmation of an anterior protein pathway in normal rabbit eyes.
Author Affiliations
  • N H Kolodny
    Department of Chemistry, Wellesley College, MA 02181, USA.
  • T F Freddo
    Department of Chemistry, Wellesley College, MA 02181, USA.
  • B A Lawrence
    Department of Chemistry, Wellesley College, MA 02181, USA.
  • C Suarez
    Department of Chemistry, Wellesley College, MA 02181, USA.
  • S P Bartels
    Department of Chemistry, Wellesley College, MA 02181, USA.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 1996, Vol.37, 1602-1607. doi:
  • Views
  • PDF
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      N H Kolodny, T F Freddo, B A Lawrence, C Suarez, S P Bartels; Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging confirmation of an anterior protein pathway in normal rabbit eyes.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1996;37(8):1602-1607.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

PURPOSE: Contrast-enhanced proton magnetic resonance imaging (1H MRI) has been used as a quantitative, noninvasive method to corroborate a pathway for the diffusion of plasma-derived protein into the aqueous humor in the normal rabbit eye. METHODS: T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were produced over 1- to 3-hour periods after the intravenous injection of gadolinium diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid. RESULTS: Analysis of the images yielded the time dependence of signal enhancements within the areas of interest. The ciliary body showed an immediate sharp increase, followed by a gradual decrease in signal enhancement with time. Although a gradual increase in signal enhancement was found in the anterior chamber, no significant change occurred in the posterior chamber. A similar MRI experiment with an owl monkey produced parallel, though smaller, signal enhancements in the ciliary body and anterior chamber. Again, however, no significant change was found in the posterior chamber. CONCLUSIONS: These results support and extend those of recent fluorophotometric, tracer-localization, and modeling studies demonstrating that in the normal rabbit and monkey eye, plasma-derived proteins bypass the posterior chamber, entering the anterior chamber directly via the iris root.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×