July 1996
Volume 37, Issue 8
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Articles  |   July 1996
Location and severity of cortical opacities in different regions of the lens in age-related cataract.
Author Affiliations
  • P Graziosi
    Institute of Ophthalmology, University of Parma, Italy.
  • F Rosmini
    Institute of Ophthalmology, University of Parma, Italy.
  • M Bonacini
    Institute of Ophthalmology, University of Parma, Italy.
  • L Ferrigno
    Institute of Ophthalmology, University of Parma, Italy.
  • R D Sperduto
    Institute of Ophthalmology, University of Parma, Italy.
  • R C Milton
    Institute of Ophthalmology, University of Parma, Italy.
  • G Maraini
    Institute of Ophthalmology, University of Parma, Italy.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 1996, Vol.37, 1698-1703. doi:
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      P Graziosi, F Rosmini, M Bonacini, L Ferrigno, R D Sperduto, R C Milton, G Maraini; Location and severity of cortical opacities in different regions of the lens in age-related cataract.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1996;37(8):1698-1703.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To examine the distribution of cortical opacities across the lens in the Italian-American Natural History Study of Age-Related Cataract and to study the association between an index of sunlight exposure and the location of cortical cataract within the lens. METHODS: Lens photographs of one eye of 731 persons with cortical opacities (503 with pure and 228 with mixed types of opacity) were included in the analysis. A radial grid superimposed on the photographs was used to assess presence, location, and severity of wedge-shaped cortical opacities. RESULTS: Both the prevalence and the extent of cortical opacities were highest in the inferior-nasal quadrant and lowest in the superior-nasal quadrant of the lens. In polychotomous logistic regression, persons with the greatest excess areal involvement in the inferior half of the lens were more likely to have high exposure to sunlight, as measured by a sunlight index, than persons with excess involvement in the superior half of the lens (odds ratio, 1.73; 95% confidence interval 1.03, 2.93). Excess areal involvement of the inferior lens also was associated with the pure type of cortical cataract and with the total extent of the opacity. CONCLUSIONS: Age-related cortical opacities occur more frequently inferiorly than superiorly and, to a lesser extent, nasally than temporally. Possibly higher exposure of these lens segments to sunlight may explain this preferential location of cortical opacities.

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