March 1999
Volume 40, Issue 3
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Articles  |   March 1999
In vivo significance of ICAM-1--dependent leukocyte adhesion in early corneal angiogenesis.
Author Affiliations
  • M D Becker
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Heidelberg, Germany.
  • F E Kruse
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Heidelberg, Germany.
  • L Azzam
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Heidelberg, Germany.
  • R Nobiling
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Heidelberg, Germany.
  • J Reichling
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Heidelberg, Germany.
  • H E Völcker
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Heidelberg, Germany.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science March 1999, Vol.40, 612-618. doi:
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      M D Becker, F E Kruse, L Azzam, R Nobiling, J Reichling, H E Völcker; In vivo significance of ICAM-1--dependent leukocyte adhesion in early corneal angiogenesis.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1999;40(3):612-618.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: Numerous investigations have stressed the significance of leukocytes in early angiogenesis. Leukocytes invade the cornea, and the location of their extravasation corresponds to the site of vessel ingrowth. The interactions between leukocytes and vascular endothelium are mediated by various proteins, including adhesion molecules such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). In this study, the role of ICAM-1 during early corneal angiogenesis was evaluated in vivo. METHODS: Corneal neovascularization was induced in New Zealand White rabbits by use of intrastromal pellets containing 750 ng vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G was used to stain leukocytes in vivo. Leukocyte adhesion and vessel growth were quantified in vivo by high-resolution fluorescence angiography. To inhibit ICAM-1 interactions a microemulsion containing anti-ICAM-1 antibody was applied topically. RESULTS: Limbal vessels showed increased leukocyte adhesion 24 hours after pellet implantation: The number of rolling and sticking leukocytes was significantly increased compared with the number in control animals (P < 0.01). Treatment with anti-ICAM-1 antibody resulted in reduced leukocyte sticking and increased leukocyte rolling. The area covered by new blood vessels was significantly diminished in eyes treated with anti-ICAM-1 (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The results support the hypothesis that ICAM-1-mediated leukocyte adhesion is a key event in early angiogenesis. This model may serve for investigation of the significance of adhesion molecules by in vivo observation and quantification.

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