January 1999
Volume 40, Issue 1
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Articles  |   January 1999
Bradykinin decreases outflow facility in perfused anterior segments and induces shape changes in passaged BTM cells in vitro.
Author Affiliations
  • A Llobet
    Departament de Ciències Fisiològiques, Hospital Clínic, Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain.
  • A Gual
    Departament de Ciències Fisiològiques, Hospital Clínic, Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain.
  • J Palés
    Departament de Ciències Fisiològiques, Hospital Clínic, Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain.
  • R Barraquer
    Departament de Ciències Fisiològiques, Hospital Clínic, Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain.
  • E Tobías
    Departament de Ciències Fisiològiques, Hospital Clínic, Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain.
  • J M Nicolás
    Departament de Ciències Fisiològiques, Hospital Clínic, Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science January 1999, Vol.40, 113-125. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      A Llobet, A Gual, J Palés, R Barraquer, E Tobías, J M Nicolás; Bradykinin decreases outflow facility in perfused anterior segments and induces shape changes in passaged BTM cells in vitro.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1999;40(1):113-125.

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of bradykinin (BK) on the outflow facility (C) of human and bovine perfused anterior segments, the [Ca2+]i of cultured bovine trabecular meshwork (BTM) cells, and the area and major axis of BTM cells. METHODS: Cellular studies were performed using first- through third-passage cultures of BTM cells. For [Ca2+]i and shape change assessment, BTM cells were loaded with fura-2 acetoxymethyl ester, and individual fluorescence images were analyzed after the different experimental manipulations. C studies were performed in vitro using human and bovine anterior segments perfused at constant pressure. RESULTS: Bradykinin at 10(-6) M elicited a [Ca2+]i increase of 8 to 10 times the basal levels in 90% of the studied cells. From the responder cells, 60% elicited a 15%+/-1% reduction of the initial cell area, and 37% showed a 13%+/-2% reduction of their major axis. Bradykinin failed to induce any effect in the presence of the BK-B2 receptor antagonist HOE-140. Zero [Ca2+]o the depletion of intracellular stores with thapsigargin, or the presence of the calmodulin antagonist W13, decreased the BK response significantly (P < 0.001; P < 0.001; and P < 0.05). A second application of BK elicited a significantly lower (P < 0.001) response than the previous one. Perfusion with 10(-6) M BK decreased CD, calculated as the area under the curve, by 13%+/-4% (P < 0.05) in human anterior segments and 12%+/-4% (P < 0.05) in bovine anterior segments. The presence of 10(-6) M HOE-140, a BK-B2 receptor antagonist, completely blocked the decrease in C after perfusion with BK. CONCLUSIONS: The C of human and bovine trabecular meshwork (perfused anterior segments) is decreased by BK, acting through BK-B2 receptors. Primary cultured BTM cells respond to BK stimulation by increasing their [Ca2+]i by mobilization of extracellular and intracellular Ca2+. Moreover, these cells are reduced in area and their major axis shortened after the [Ca2+]i peak elicited by BK through BK-B2 receptors. The [Ca2+]i mobilization and shape changes are calmodulin dependent. Taking into account the [Ca2+]i mobilization, the BTM shape changes, the decrease of C, and the temporal sequence of these parameters, a contraction of trabecular meshwork cells related to the functional role of trabecular meshwork is discussed.

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