May 1999
Volume 40, Issue 6
Free
Articles  |   May 1999
Immunolocalization of muscarinic and VIP receptor subtypes and their role in stimulating goblet cell secretion.
Author Affiliations
  • J D Ríos
    Schepens Eye Research Institute and Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
  • D Zoukhri
    Schepens Eye Research Institute and Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
  • I M Rawe
    Schepens Eye Research Institute and Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
  • R R Hodges
    Schepens Eye Research Institute and Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
  • J D Zieske
    Schepens Eye Research Institute and Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
  • D A Dartt
    Schepens Eye Research Institute and Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 1999, Vol.40, 1102-1111. doi:
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      J D Ríos, D Zoukhri, I M Rawe, R R Hodges, J D Zieske, D A Dartt; Immunolocalization of muscarinic and VIP receptor subtypes and their role in stimulating goblet cell secretion.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1999;40(6):1102-1111.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To determine the subtypes of cholinergic muscarinic receptors and receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) present in rat conjunctival goblet cells and whether cholinergic agonists and VIP stimulate goblet cell secretion. METHODS: Immunofluorescence studies were performed using antibodies against the m1, m2, and m3 muscarinic receptor subtypes and VIP receptors 1 and 2 (VIPR1 and VIPR2). The lectin Ulex europeus agglutinin I was used to measure glycoconjugate secretion, the index of secretion, from goblet cells in an enzyme-linked lectin assay. In this assay, pieces of conjunctiva were placed on filter paper and incubated for 15 to 120 minutes, with or without increasing concentrations of the cholinergic agonist carbachol or VIP. The muscarinic antagonist atropine and the muscarinic receptor-subtype-selective antagonists pirenzepine (M1), gallamine (M2), and 4-4-diphenylacetoxy-N-(2-chloroethyl)-piperidine hydrochloride (4-DAMP mustard; M3) were incubated with carbachol to determine specificity of receptor activation. RESULTS: Immunoreactivity to M2 and M3 receptors was found on goblet cell membranes subjacent to the secretory granules. Immunoreactivity to M1 receptor was not on goblet cells but was on the stratitfied squamous cells. Immunoreactivity to VIPR2 was found on goblet cells with a localization similar to that of the M2 and M3 receptors. VIPR1 was not found on goblet cells or on the stratified squamous cells. Carbachol and VIP induced a time- and concentration-dependent stimulation of glycoconjugate secretion. Carbachol, at 10(-4) M, induced a threefold increase in glycoconjugate secretion, which was completely inhibited by atropine (10(-5) M). Carbachol-induced secretion was inhibited 54% +/- 8% by pirenzepine (10(-5) M), 69% +/- 14% by gallamine (10(-5) M), and 72% +/- 11% by 4-DAMP mustard (10(-5) M). A twofold increase in glycoconjugate secretion was obtained with VIP at 10(-8) M. CONCLUSIONS: Cholinergic agonists, through M2 and/or M3 muscarinic receptors, and VIP, through VIPR2, regulate conjunctival goblet cell secretion, suggesting that goblet cell secretion in vivo is under the control of parasympathetic nerves.

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