April 1967
Volume 6, Issue 2
Free
Articles  |   April 1967
An Electrical Model of the Human Eye
Author Affiliations
  • MARVIN SHEPHERD
    Department of Ophthalmology and the Francis I. Proctor Foundation of the University of California-San Francisco Medical Center San Francisco, Calif.
  • EARLE H. McBAIN
    Department of Ophthalmology and the Francis I. Proctor Foundation of the University of California-San Francisco Medical Center San Francisco, Calif.
  • W. K. McEWEN
    Department of Ophthalmology and the Francis I. Proctor Foundation of the University of California-San Francisco Medical Center San Francisco, Calif.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 1967, Vol.6, 160-170. doi:
  • Views
  • PDF
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      MARVIN SHEPHERD, EARLE H. McBAIN, W. K. McEWEN; An Electrical Model of the Human Eye . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1967;6(2):160-170.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

A basic electrical model of the eye can be distorted analogously to the distortion of an eye when a tonometer is placed upon it. It may then be caused to match a clinical tonogram by adjustment of facility of outflow and stress relaxation. The classical elastic concept of the eye is compared to the viscoelastic concept by the use of models. Stress relaxation is offered as an explanation of the "first minute effect." The degree of match of model to tonogram is illustrated by published normal tonograms. The electrical model does not provide very different quantitative values for facility of outflow, but it does strengthen the concept of viscoelasticity of the eye. The degree of fit of the model to published clinical tonograms and the data derived therefrom is illustrated and discussed.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×