July 1976
Volume 15, Issue 7
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Articles  |   July 1976
The contralateral effect of antidromic stimulation of the trigeminal nerve on the rabbit eye.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 1976, Vol.15, 564-566. doi:https://doi.org/
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      E Maul, M L Sears; The contralateral effect of antidromic stimulation of the trigeminal nerve on the rabbit eye.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1976;15(7):564-566. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

The effect on contralateral eyes after injuries to one eye has been called the consensual reaction and has been postulated to be either the consequence of a neural reflex or one achieved by circulating substances. Trigeminal stimulation always causes ipsilateral miosis, ocular hyperemia, intraocular hypertension, and a disruption of the blood-aqueous barrier. Disruption of the blood-aqueous barrier in the contralateral eye after stimulation of the trigeminal nerve always occurs and depends on intact sensory innervation to that globe in rabbits. The disruption is not prevneted by pretreatment of the animals with indomethacin. The phenomenon of disruption of the barrier is sometimes accompanied by an elevation of intraocular pressure in the contralateral eye but not by the other irritative responses. Thus, unilateral stimulation of a sensory nerve, the trigeminal, in the rabbit, can produce ipsilateral contralateral disruption of the blood-aqueous barrier.

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