August 1978
Volume 17, Issue 8
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Articles  |   August 1978
The effects of intravitreally injected prostaglandin E1 on retinal function and their enhancement by a prostaglandin-transporter inhibitor.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science August 1978, Vol.17, 795-799. doi:
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      M C Wallenstein, L Z Bito; The effects of intravitreally injected prostaglandin E1 on retinal function and their enhancement by a prostaglandin-transporter inhibitor.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1978;17(8):795-799.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

The effects of intravitreally injected prostaglandins (PG's) E1 and F2alpha were studied on conscious, bromcresol green (BrCG)-pretreated and control rabbits. The electroretinogram (ERG) of both the PG-injected and the contralateral control eyes was recorded with contact lens electrodes; and electrocorticogram and the visually evoked response (VER) were recorded from both hemispheres with previously implanted supradural electrodes. In normal rabbits, intravitreal injection of 0.70 mg of PGE1 resulted in a small reduction in the amplitude of the ERG b-wave and of the slow negative wave (SNW) of the contralateral VER. In BrCG-pretreated rabbits, intravitreal injection of 0.70 mg of PGE1 caused a statistically significant decrease in the amplitude of the ERG b-wave and the SNW. Intravitreal injection of 0.7 mg of PGE1 also caused a significantly prolonged inhibition of the ERG in BrCG-pretreated, but not in normal rabbits, following exposure of the eye to a bright light flash. A smaller dose of PGE1 (0.35 mg/eye) caused more moderate effects on some of these parameters. These effects could not be explained by the PG-induced miosis. PGF2alpha (0.7 mg/eye) caused no significant changes in any of the parameters studied. These results indicate that exogenous PG's can have adverse effects on retinal function and that these effects are enhanced by BrCG, a PG-transport inhibitor. Presumably, this inhibitor blocks the PG-removal mechanisms across the blood-retinal barriers and hence allows the accumulation of PG's in the extracellular fluids of the retina.

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