August 1986
Volume 27, Issue 8
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Articles  |   August 1986
Corneal endothelial healing rate and the effect of topical retinoic acid.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science August 1986, Vol.27, 1193-1198. doi:
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      M Matsuda, J L Ubels, H F Edelhauser; Corneal endothelial healing rate and the effect of topical retinoic acid.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1986;27(8):1193-1198.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

These studies were undertaken to evaluate wound healing rates of the corneal endothelium in vivo. After insertion of a 26-gauge needle into the anterior chamber of the rabbit eye through the limbus, a 5-0 nylon monofilament was introduced through the needle, and endothelial wounds were made by scratching the cells with the filament. The wounds were photographed with a wide-field specular microscope at various intervals. Montages of the wounds were made, and the areas of the wounds were determined by planimetry. Wound closure occurred rapidly in a linear manner during the first 6 hr after wounding, after which the rate of cell migration decreased. Healing rates (micron2/hr) during the first 6 hr were calculated by linear regression analysis. There was a direct linear correlation between the healing rate and initial wound area. The slope of this line for nine normal (untreated) corneas was 0.093 hr-1. Nine corneas were treated with 0.1% retinoic acid in petrolatum ointment, while eight control corneas received vehicle alone. The slope of healing rate versus initial wound area for treated corneas (0.11 hr-1) was significantly greater than control (0.097 hr-1). This was interpreted as a stimulation of corneal endothelial migration during healing by retinoic acid. As a result of this study, a method for analysis of corneal endothelial healing rate has been developed which can be used for comparison of healing rates among treatments when initial wound area cannot be standardized.

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