September 1986
Volume 27, Issue 9
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Articles  |   September 1986
The influence of phosphodiesterase inhibitors on ERG and optic nerve response of the cat.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 1986, Vol.27, 1395-1403. doi:
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      T Schneider, E Zrenner; The influence of phosphodiesterase inhibitors on ERG and optic nerve response of the cat.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1986;27(9):1395-1403.

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Abstract

Reversible changes in electroretinograms (ERG) and optic nerve responses (ONR), induced by various concentrations of four different types of phosphodiesterase (PDE)-inhibitors, were recorded from arterially perfused, isolated cat eyes. In the dark-adapted eye, the implicit time of the PIII-component of the ERG, isolated by temporary hypoxia, showed a dose-dependent increase after the injection of PDE-inhibitors into the ophthalmociliary artery. The PIII-amplitude increased in response to small doses of PDE-inhibitors, whereas higher doses led to an amplitude decrease. Rod b-wave amplitude and implicit time showed similar alterations. An amplitude increase could not be observed in the rod ONR. In the light-adapted eye, 440 nm and 555 nm cones were functionally separated by means of chromatic adaptation. Their ERG and ONR implicit times were prolonged under PDE-inhibition. The amplitude behaviour of both types of cones showed a different concentration dependency. Certain concentrations of PDE-inhibitors depressed the short-wavelength sensitive cone, while, at the same time, sensitizing the long-wavelength sensitive cone. The amplitude increase of the L-cone b-wave was accompanied by a response increase of tonic ganglion cells in the ONR.

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