February 1988
Volume 29, Issue 2
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Articles  |   February 1988
Ganglionic permissivity to HSV-1 replication and acyclovir-induced latency: an in vitro model.
Author Affiliations
  • J A Millin
    Hilles Immunology Laboratory, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston 02114.
  • E M Opremcak
    Hilles Immunology Laboratory, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston 02114.
  • P A Wells
    Hilles Immunology Laboratory, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston 02114.
  • C S Foster
    Hilles Immunology Laboratory, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston 02114.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science February 1988, Vol.29, 232-238. doi:
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      J A Millin, E M Opremcak, P A Wells, C S Foster; Ganglionic permissivity to HSV-1 replication and acyclovir-induced latency: an in vitro model.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1988;29(2):232-238.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

HSV-1 is known to establish latent infections in murine trigeminal ganglia. In order to study the genetic influence of the host on permissivity to HSV-1 replication and latency in mouse trigeminal ganglia, an in vitro culture system was developed. Ganglia from HSV sensitive A/J and resistant C57BL/6J mice were harvested and inoculated in vitro with either MP or KOS strains of HSV-1. Infected ganglia were placed in culture for 7 days with or without 150 micrograms/ml acyclovir. Ganglia were then homogenized and assayed for infectious particles or frozen whole for standard immunostaining. A/J ganglia without acyclovir consistently demonstrated a three-fold higher viral replication compared to C57BL/6J ganglia without acyclovir for both MP and KOS. Indirect immunofluorescent staining of actively infected ganglia using rabbit anti-HSV antiserum showed increased staining in A/J ganglionic axons compared to C57BL/6J ganglionic axons. Ganglia from both murine strains showed total suppression of viral replication with acyclovir treatment. Immunostaining for latent viral protein with mouse monoclonal anti-ICP-4 (VP 175) was positive for both A/J and C57BL/6J strains following acyclovir treatment. Desuppression of acyclovir-treated whole ganglia resulted in 54% spontaneous HSV reactivation. These results suggest that: (1) HSV-1 can establish an active infection in whole murine trigeminal ganglia in vitro; (2) HSV-1 replicates to a greater extent in A/J ganglia compared to C57BL/6 ganglia; and (3) in vitro HSV-1 ganglionic infection in both murine strains is equally suppressed to a latent state by acyclovir treatment.

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