December 1988
Volume 29, Issue 12
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Articles  |   December 1988
Trabecular meshwork cells grown on filters. Conductivity and cytochalasin effects.
Author Affiliations
  • T W Perkins
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco 94143.
  • J A Alvarado
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco 94143.
  • J R Polansky
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco 94143.
  • L Stilwell
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco 94143.
  • M Maglio
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco 94143.
  • R Juster
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco 94143.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science December 1988, Vol.29, 1836-1846. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      T W Perkins, J A Alvarado, J R Polansky, L Stilwell, M Maglio, R Juster; Trabecular meshwork cells grown on filters. Conductivity and cytochalasin effects.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1988;29(12):1836-1846.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

A system was developed to measure the hydraulic conductivity of cultured monolayers of human trabecular meshwork (HTM) cells. By optimizing the cell growth conditions and evaluating a number of filter supports, confluent HTM cells in single layers were obtained for measurement of hydraulic conductivity. The HTM monolayers had hydraulic conductivities of 0.3-2.0 microliters/min/mm Hg/cm2 measured at near-physiological flow rates. Evaluations of cytochalasin B (CB) effects on the hydraulic conductivity of our HTM monolayers revealed that CB (10(-6) to 10(-5) M) caused a dramatic dose-related increase in conductivity within 10 to 30 min, which parallels CB effects on outflow facility in vivo. Morphologic observations show that the increase in hydraulic conductivity was accompanied by a retraction of the trabecular cells and widening of the intercellular spaces. Our findings suggest that growth of HTM cells on filter supports can provide a useful in vitro system to study the regulation of aqueous outflow.

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