January 1989
Volume 30, Issue 1
Free
Articles  |   January 1989
Factors associated with visual outcome after photocoagulation for diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic Retinopathy Study Report #13.
Author Affiliations
  • S C Kaufman
    Biometry and Epidemiology Program, National Eye Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892.
  • F L Ferris, 3rd
    Biometry and Epidemiology Program, National Eye Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892.
  • D G Seigel
    Biometry and Epidemiology Program, National Eye Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892.
  • M D Davis
    Biometry and Epidemiology Program, National Eye Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892.
  • D L DeMets
    Biometry and Epidemiology Program, National Eye Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science January 1989, Vol.30, 23-28. doi:
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      S C Kaufman, F L Ferris, D G Seigel, M D Davis, D L DeMets; Factors associated with visual outcome after photocoagulation for diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic Retinopathy Study Report #13.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1989;30(1):23-28.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Six risk factors for severe visual loss despite panretinal (scatter) photocoagulation were identified by analyzing data collected during the first 5 years after randomization in the Diabetic Retinopathy Study. Proportional hazards regression revealed NVD (neovascularization on/around the optic disc) to be the most important risk factor. The risk of severe visual loss rose with increasing NVD, hemorrhages/microaneurysms, retinal elevation, proteinuria, and hyperglycemia and fell with increasing "treatment density." These results are similar to previous DRS findings on untreated eyes. The importance of "treatment density" as an independent predictor of visual outcome is a new finding and lends support to the common clinical practice of repeating photocoagulation if initial treatment does not reduce or stabilize retinal neovascularization.

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