October 1989
Volume 30, Issue 10
Free
Articles  |   October 1989
Rhesus monkey lens as an in vitro model for studying oxidative stress.
Author Affiliations
  • J S Zigler, Jr
    Laboratory of Mechanisms of Ocular Disease, National Eye Institute, Bethesda, Maryland.
  • V A Lucas
    Laboratory of Mechanisms of Ocular Disease, National Eye Institute, Bethesda, Maryland.
  • X Y Du
    Laboratory of Mechanisms of Ocular Disease, National Eye Institute, Bethesda, Maryland.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science October 1989, Vol.30, 2195-2199. doi:
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      J S Zigler, V A Lucas, X Y Du; Rhesus monkey lens as an in vitro model for studying oxidative stress.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1989;30(10):2195-2199.

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Abstract

Lenses from young rhesus monkeys were incubated in the presence of H2O2 or oxygen radical generating systems to determine their suitability as a model for investigating lenticular oxidative stress. Additionally, direct comparisons were made between the effects found with the monkey lenses and those observed with cultured rat lenses exposed to the same oxidizing systems. As in earlier studies with rat lenses the monkey lenses exhibited impaired ability to actively accumulate from the medium radioactively labelled rubidium and choline following exposure to oxidative stress. Based on the effects of various scavengers of oxygen radicals it appeared that the mechanisms responsible for lens damage were the same for both rat and monkey lenses. However, rat lenses were damaged by lower concentrations of oxidants than were monkey lenses. It was concluded that oxidative stress affects both rat and monkey lenses by similar mechanisms but that lenses from monkeys, and probably other primates, are more resistant to these effects because they have better endogenous antioxidant defenses.

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