August 1989
Volume 30, Issue 8
Free
Articles  |   August 1989
Hyperthermic treatment of rabbit corneas.
Author Affiliations
  • W S Goldblatt
    Department of Ophthalmology, North Shore University Hospital-Cornell University Medical College, Manhasset, New York 11030.
  • P T Finger
    Department of Ophthalmology, North Shore University Hospital-Cornell University Medical College, Manhasset, New York 11030.
  • H D Perry
    Department of Ophthalmology, North Shore University Hospital-Cornell University Medical College, Manhasset, New York 11030.
  • E M Stroh
    Department of Ophthalmology, North Shore University Hospital-Cornell University Medical College, Manhasset, New York 11030.
  • D S Weiser
    Department of Ophthalmology, North Shore University Hospital-Cornell University Medical College, Manhasset, New York 11030.
  • E D Donnenfeld
    Department of Ophthalmology, North Shore University Hospital-Cornell University Medical College, Manhasset, New York 11030.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science August 1989, Vol.30, 1778-1783. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      W S Goldblatt, P T Finger, H D Perry, E M Stroh, D S Weiser, E D Donnenfeld; Hyperthermic treatment of rabbit corneas.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1989;30(8):1778-1783.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Well defined heat doses (temperature X time) were applied to normal rabbit corneas in an effort to determine thermal tolerance, and to examine the effects of heat on this tissue. A purely conductive heater was chosen to minimize intraocular penetration, and avoid findings attributable to nonthermal effects of inductive sources. The etched element heater was sewn to 38 rabbit corneas. Thirty-six were treated to temperatures of 38, 45, 52 and/or 59 degrees centigrade for durations of 5, 15, or 45 min. Three eyes were treated at each time-temperature interval and sacrificed at either time 0, 1 day or 1 week follow-up. Histologic examinations were performed on all corneas. A corneal haze was first noted at 45 degrees C X 45 minutes X 1 day follow-up. This correlated with a mild stromal edema on light microscopy. Higher thermal doses produced a spectrum of damage, with complete destruction of all keratocytes and endothelial cells at 59 degrees C X 45 min. At levels greater than 45 degrees C x 45 min, heat damage was noted to be increased at 24 hr followup. Some recovery was noted by 1 week follow-up, with the exception of the 59 degrees C X 15 or 45 min groups. These two heat doses induced a drop-out of cellular elements with evidence of disintegration and fragmentation of collagen fibrils. Conductive heating of up to 45 degrees C X 15 min appeared well tolerated by normal rabbit corneas.

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