May 1989
Volume 30, Issue 5
Free
Articles  |   May 1989
Optical constancy of the chick lens during pre- and post-hatching ocular development.
Author Affiliations
  • J G Sivak
    School of Optometry, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
  • L A Ryall
    School of Optometry, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
  • J Weerheim
    School of Optometry, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
  • M C Campbell
    School of Optometry, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 1989, Vol.30, 967-974. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      J G Sivak, L A Ryall, J Weerheim, M C Campbell; Optical constancy of the chick lens during pre- and post-hatching ocular development.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1989;30(5):967-974.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Embryonic and post-embryonic development of the ocular lens is associated with the continual production of new secondary lens fibers by the mitotic activity of equatorial epithelial cells. This continual development affects lens size and shape and refractive index distribution. Study of embryonic lens optical function has been largely ignored. The optical characteristics of the developing chick lens, including paraxial and eccentric focal lengths, were measured during the embryonic period of development and up to 15 days after hatching. Measurements were made with an automated scanning laser system in which the video image of a helium-neon laser beam refracted by an excised lens in solution is digitized. Focal length is measured for beams moving in small steps on either side of that center. Measurements were made on excised lenses as well as with the lens in situ within the anterior segment of the eye. The results, collected from a study of a total of 80 lenses, indicates that embryo lenses at 6-7 days of incubation have long and very variable focal lengths. At the tenth embryo day, focal length drops by more than one-half and focal variations, between lenses and for different beam positions within a single lens, is reduced. Further measures for 14- and 17-day embryo lenses, as well as for lenses from hatchling and 5-, 10- and 15-day-old chicks, indicate that there is little change in focal length, either paraxially or for eccentric beam positions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

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