July 1989
Volume 30, Issue 7
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Articles  |   July 1989
Predictors of functional success in telescopic spectacle use by low vision patients.
Author Affiliations
  • J L Demer
    Jules Stein Eye Institute, UCLA Medical School 90024-1771.
  • F I Porter
    Jules Stein Eye Institute, UCLA Medical School 90024-1771.
  • J Goldberg
    Jules Stein Eye Institute, UCLA Medical School 90024-1771.
  • H A Jenkins
    Jules Stein Eye Institute, UCLA Medical School 90024-1771.
  • K Schmidt
    Jules Stein Eye Institute, UCLA Medical School 90024-1771.
  • I Ulrich
    Jules Stein Eye Institute, UCLA Medical School 90024-1771.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 1989, Vol.30, 1652-1665. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      J L Demer, F I Porter, J Goldberg, H A Jenkins, K Schmidt, I Ulrich; Predictors of functional success in telescopic spectacle use by low vision patients.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1989;30(7):1652-1665.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Telescopic spectacles can theoretically improve function of low vision patients by enlarging retinal images. However, unintended head movement may produce sufficient instability of enlarged retinal images to negate the visual benefit. We investigated this phenomenon as a cause of failure in 38 low vision patients who had previously attempted use of telescopic spectacles. Patients underwent evaluation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, visual-vestibulo-ocular reflex, head stability in the pitch and yaw axes, and sensitivity of magnified visual acuity to head motion. Although it was impossible to distinguish successful from unsuccessful telescopic spectacle users by means of clinical or historical data, multiple logistic regression analysis was used to derive a useful predictive function based on measurements of sensitivity of magnified vision to head motion, and head instability in the pitch axis. Predictive performance was found to be superior to conventional clinical judgement. These findings support the hypothesis that retinal image stability is important to functional vision, and suggest that head-stabilizing strategies may improve function with telescopic spectacles in certain low vision patients.

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