February 1992
Volume 33, Issue 2
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Articles  |   February 1992
The effects of complement depletion on corneal inflammation in rats.
Author Affiliations
  • C Verhagen
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
  • A C Breebaart
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
  • A Kijlstra
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science February 1992, Vol.33, 273-279. doi:
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      C Verhagen, A C Breebaart, A Kijlstra; The effects of complement depletion on corneal inflammation in rats.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1992;33(2):273-279.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

There are indications that complement activation may be involved in inflammatory processes of the cornea. To investigate the role of the complement system in experimental keratitis, rats were depleted of their plasma complement by treatment with cobra venom factor (CVF). intraperitoneal injection of CVF resulted in undetectable complement serum activity for 6 days when measured by a hemolytic assay. The corneal inflammatory response, induced by a single intracorneal injection of heterologous serum into nonsensitized CVF-treated rats, was suppressed significantly. The onset of the clinical symptoms of keratitis was delayed, and the severity was reduced. In addition, analysis of the serum antibody titers showed impaired antibody synthesis in the CVF-treated group. When keratitis was induced by an intracorneal antigen challenge in sensitized rats, no difference was observed when comparing the clinical signs of keratitis of CVF-treated animals with sham-treated animals. In addition, CVF treatment did not alter the course of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced corneal inflammation. These findings suggest that the role of plasma complement activation in antigen- and LPS-induced keratitis appears to be limited. The implications for the immunopathologic mechanisms underlying keratitis are discussed.

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