October 1992
Volume 33, Issue 11
Free
Articles  |   October 1992
A new in vitro corneal preparation to study epithelial wound healing.
Author Affiliations
  • D L Tanelian
    Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas 75235-9068.
  • K Bisla
    Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas 75235-9068.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science October 1992, Vol.33, 3024-3028. doi:
  • Views
  • PDF
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      D L Tanelian, K Bisla; A new in vitro corneal preparation to study epithelial wound healing.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1992;33(11):3024-3028.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Corneal epithelial wound healing is an important process necessary for maintenance of visual integrity. Corneal epithelial wound healing occurs by cellular migration and proliferation. However, the molecular basis of reepithelialization is not known. To investigate individual molecular contributions to the wound healing process, an in vitro corneal preparation comparable to the in vivo condition is needed. This investigation developed a new whole mount in vitro rabbit cornea preparation and studied epithelial wound healing rates for epithelial and subepithelial wounds. The wound closure rates obtained in this study for epithelial and subepithelial wound healing (52 +/- 14 microns/hr and 38 +/- 7 microns/hr, respectively) are comparable to in vivo rates of wound healing determined by other laboratories for rabbits. This preparation, achieved by functionally separating the epithelial and endothelial sides of the cornea, allows application of agents to the cornea in a manner that approximates the in vivo condition. This in vitro system is promising for future studies designed to investigate corneal wound healing while reducing potential ocular discomfort associated with in vivo corneal wounding.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×