February 1992
Volume 33, Issue 2
Free
Articles  |   February 1992
Collagen shields as a vehicle for collecting and studying migratory cells on human corneas.
Author Affiliations
  • S D Geasey
    Cornea Research Laboratory, University of Rochester, New York.
  • M del Cerro
    Cornea Research Laboratory, University of Rochester, New York.
  • M D DePaolis
    Cornea Research Laboratory, University of Rochester, New York.
  • J V Aquavella
    Cornea Research Laboratory, University of Rochester, New York.
  • R S Viola
    Cornea Research Laboratory, University of Rochester, New York.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science February 1992, Vol.33, 298-303. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      S D Geasey, M del Cerro, M D DePaolis, J V Aquavella, R S Viola; Collagen shields as a vehicle for collecting and studying migratory cells on human corneas.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1992;33(2):298-303.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Collagen shields have been studied in the enhancement of the initial healing of epithelial defects, as an adjunct in the treatment of dry eye, and as a reservoir and delivery system for topical ocular medications. The authors used collagen shields to collect information on the numbers and types of free cells populating the normal and postoperative ocular surface. In addition, correlative microscopic techniques were used to study details of the mechanisms responsible for the dissolution of the shields when applied to the human eye. Collagen shields were applied as a bandage lens on the eyes of patients who underwent extracapsular cataract extraction (n = 10) or penetrating keratoplasty (n = 10) and on normal volunteers (n = 10). The shields were collected at the 1-day postoperative examination and fixed in aldehyde mixtures. Specimens then were processed for correlative light (LM), transmission (TEM), and scanning (SEM) microscopy. Cell accumulation was shown by SEM on both anterior and posterior shield surfaces. Cell adherence occurred primarily on the posterior shield periphery for approximately 2 mm, with the central zone relatively clean. Both LM and TEM evaluation revealed cell counts ranging from 0.066 cells/10(4) microns2 (standard deviation, +/- 0.256) in healthy eyes compared with shields placed on postoperative eyes (194.25 +/- 7.32 cells/10(4) microns2). Various correlative microscopy techniques revealed that most cells were polymorphonuclear leukocytes with a low number of other hematogenous (lymphocytes and monocytes) and exfoliated epithelial cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

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