October 1992
Volume 33, Issue 11
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Articles  |   October 1992
Mid-frequency loss of foveal flicker sensitivity in early stages of age-related maculopathy.
Author Affiliations
  • M J Mayer
    Program in Experimental Psychology, University of California, Santa Cruz 95064.
  • S J Spiegler
    Program in Experimental Psychology, University of California, Santa Cruz 95064.
  • B Ward
    Program in Experimental Psychology, University of California, Santa Cruz 95064.
  • A Glucs
    Program in Experimental Psychology, University of California, Santa Cruz 95064.
  • C B Kim
    Program in Experimental Psychology, University of California, Santa Cruz 95064.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science October 1992, Vol.33, 3136-3142. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      M J Mayer, S J Spiegler, B Ward, A Glucs, C B Kim; Mid-frequency loss of foveal flicker sensitivity in early stages of age-related maculopathy.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1992;33(11):3136-3142.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Temporal contrast sensitivity in eyes at risk for exudative age-related maculopathy (ARM) was compared to that in age-matched healthy older eyes. The test stimulus was a foveally viewed, flickering, long-wavelength 2.8 degrees diameter circle in an equiluminant (photopic) surround. Retinal illuminance and decision criterion differences were experimentally controlled. Eyes in the healthy and ARM-risk groups had 20/30 or better Snellen acuity and intraocular pressure of less than 22 mmHg. Nevertheless, the ARM-risk patients were less sensitive to flicker contrast, especially for mid-temporal frequencies. This suggests that flicker sensitivity may be useful in identifying patients at risk for exudative ARM. In addition, comparison with other research reveals a paradox: Mid-temporal frequency sensitivity losses may be attributable primarily to a "high temporal frequency" mechanism.

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