October 1992
Volume 33, Issue 11
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Articles  |   October 1992
Assessment of physiologic statokinetic dissociation by automated perimetry.
Author Affiliations
  • C Hudson
    Department of Vision Sciences, Aston University, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
  • J M Wild
    Department of Vision Sciences, Aston University, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science October 1992, Vol.33, 3162-3168. doi:
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      C Hudson, J M Wild; Assessment of physiologic statokinetic dissociation by automated perimetry.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1992;33(11):3162-3168.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

The effects of age, stimulus size, meridian, and eccentricity on physiologic statokinetic dissociation were investigated in clinically normal subjects using the Humphrey field analyzer (HFA, model 640), an automated perimeter capable of both static and kinetic perimetry. The right eyes of 20 age-matched young and 20 age-matched elderly volunteers was examined along the 15 degrees and 195 degrees meridians with six Goldmann size I and five size III kinetic stimuli. These were chosen to produce a spread of discrete eccentricities. Kinetic sensitivity was determined seven times for each stimulus, and the mean stimulus locations were expressed in terms of their x and y coordinates. Static sensitivity for each stimulus size then was determined seven times at each of the corresponding locations using a custom threshold program. The area under each sensitivity gradient was determined using the trapezium rule. Group mean kinetic sensitivity was greater than group mean static sensitivity (P < 0.001), and this difference was largely independent of age, stimulus size, meridian, and eccentricity.

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