July 1992
Volume 33, Issue 8
Free
Articles  |   July 1992
Microsurgery of the retina with a needle-guided 193-nm excimer laser.
Author Affiliations
  • A Lewis
    Division of Applied Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Givat Ram, Israel.
  • D Palanker
    Division of Applied Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Givat Ram, Israel.
  • I Hemo
    Division of Applied Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Givat Ram, Israel.
  • J Pe'er
    Division of Applied Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Givat Ram, Israel.
  • H Zauberman
    Division of Applied Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Givat Ram, Israel.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 1992, Vol.33, 2377-2381. doi:
  • Views
  • PDF
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      A Lewis, D Palanker, I Hemo, J Pe'er, H Zauberman; Microsurgery of the retina with a needle-guided 193-nm excimer laser.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1992;33(8):2377-2381.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

This article presents a method used to guide the beam from an argon fluoride excimer laser to make it suitable for microsurgical purposes and confine it to areas that can be varied in dimension from 1 micron to tens or hundreds of microns. This approach guides the excimer laser beam with an articulated mechanical arm and confines it with variable-diameter tapered tubes, possibly allowing the use of this laser in in vitro retinal surgery with endolaser techniques. Currently, because of the lack of a delivery and focusing system for the 193-nm argon fluoride beam and its absorption by biologic liquids, this laser is used exclusively in ophthalmology for topical applications, such as corneal sculpting. This new method resolves these problems in a unique way with impressive results. Specifically, it was shown that, with this needle-guided excimer laser, it is possible to remove retinal tissue accurately without detectable damage to surrounding cells. Applications of this new technique in retinal surgery are discussed.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×