January 1993
Volume 34, Issue 1
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Articles  |   January 1993
Fibrin induction of thrombospondin in corneal endothelial cells in vitro.
Author Affiliations
  • M L Ramsby
    Department of Pathology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington 06030.
  • D L Kreutzer
    Department of Pathology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington 06030.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science January 1993, Vol.34, 165-174. doi:
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      M L Ramsby, D L Kreutzer; Fibrin induction of thrombospondin in corneal endothelial cells in vitro.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1993;34(1):165-174.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: Fibrin deposition in the anterior chamber of the eye occurs in response to injury or inflammation and can permanently damage the corneal endothelium. Fibrin functions as a mediator of inflammation and wound healing by affecting cell morphology and function in a variety of cells, including corneal endothelial cells. We hypothesized that fibrin can directly induce corneal endothelial cells to express injury-related proteins (eg, thrombospondin [TSP]) necessary for corneal repair processes. METHODS: Bovine corneal endothelial cells (BCECs) were pulse- or continuously labeled with 35S-methionine in the presence or absence of in situ polymerized fibrin (2 mg/ml). BCECs were harvested after 3-48 hr, and 35S-labeled proteins were analyzed by SDS-PAGE, autoradiography, and immunochemical techniques. RESULTS: Fibrin selectively induced BCECs to express a high molecular weight (MW) protein that was present extracellularly in conditioned medium and fibrin matrix. This induction represented a 3-5 fold increase relative to nonfibrin-treated BCECs, was not accompanied by corresponding changes in 35S-labeled intracellular proteins, and was evident at early (3 hr) or late times (24 hr) post-fibrin treatment. The induced protein had an apparent MW of 180 kD (reduced) and > 420 kD (nonreduced), consistent with the characteristics of TSP. A polyclonal antibody to human TSP recognized the reduced form (180 kD) on Western blots and the native form (> 420 kD) in immunoprecipitation studies. CONCLUSIONS: Fibrin induces BCECs to express TSP, a matrix protein involved in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions and implicated in wound healing.

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