February 1993
Volume 34, Issue 2
Free
Articles  |   February 1993
Light transmittance of ocular media in living rabbit eyes.
Author Affiliations
  • P V Algvere
    Department of Ophthalmology, Karolinska Institute, Gothenburg, Sweden.
  • P A Torstensson
    Department of Ophthalmology, Karolinska Institute, Gothenburg, Sweden.
  • B M Tengroth
    Department of Ophthalmology, Karolinska Institute, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science February 1993, Vol.34, 349-354. doi:
  • Views
  • PDF
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      P V Algvere, P A Torstensson, B M Tengroth; Light transmittance of ocular media in living rabbit eyes.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1993;34(2):349-354.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to measure the transmittance of electromagnetic radiation, particularly visible light, through the ocular media of living and whole rabbit eyes. Previous determinations have been carried out on excised cadaver eyes. METHODS: A specially designed fiberoptic probe (outer diameter, 0.9 mm) was placed in the vitreous in front of the retina using a microsurgical technique. In eight living albino rabbits (under general anesthesia), ocular transmittance was determined in the wavelength range 350 to 1100 nm using a reversed beam path (from vitreous to cornea). RESULTS: A maximum optical transmittance of 94% to 96% (standard deviation, 2%-3%) was found between 630 and 730 nm (reflection losses in the cornea-air interface excluded). In the blue portion of the spectrum, transmittance decreased rapidly for shorter wavelengths, and was 50% at 400 nm and less than 1% at 380 nm. In the infrared part of the spectrum, transmittance was close to 90% up to 900 nm but declined at longer wavelengths, coinciding with the absorption in pure water. Calibration recordings showed a 1% to 2% accuracy of the method. CONCLUSIONS: This experimental technique using an intraocular fiberoptic probe yields a high accuracy and indicates that light transmittance is very high in vivo and superior to that reported from cadaver eyes.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×