April 1993
Volume 34, Issue 5
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Articles  |   April 1993
Microinjection of L-lactate in the preretinal vitreous induces segmental vasodilation in the inner retina of miniature pigs.
Author Affiliations
  • P D Brazitikos
    Experimental Ophthalmology Laboratory, University of Geneva, Switzerland.
  • C J Pournaras
    Experimental Ophthalmology Laboratory, University of Geneva, Switzerland.
  • J L Munoz
    Experimental Ophthalmology Laboratory, University of Geneva, Switzerland.
  • M Tsacopoulos
    Experimental Ophthalmology Laboratory, University of Geneva, Switzerland.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 1993, Vol.34, 1744-1752. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      P D Brazitikos, C J Pournaras, J L Munoz, M Tsacopoulos; Microinjection of L-lactate in the preretinal vitreous induces segmental vasodilation in the inner retina of miniature pigs.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1993;34(5):1744-1752.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: The authors investigated the hypothesis that the retinal vasomotor effect of acute hypoxia is mediated by lactate. METHODS: Retinal vasomotor arteriolar response was measured in the intact eyes of miniature pigs after systemic administration and after local preretinal juxta-arteriolar microinjection of lactate. RESULTS: Injection of L-lactate (physiologically produced lactate) into the systemic circulation decreased the arterial blood pH but did not dilate the retinal arterioles. By contrast, microinjections of L-lactate (0.5 mol/l, pH 2) into the juxta-arteriolar vitreous induced a reversible segmental vasodilation of 32 +/- 4% (standard deviation). This vasodilation did not depend on periarteriolar pH lowering because microinjections of a 0.5 mol/l L-lactate at neutral pH also dilated segmentally the retinal arterioles (37 +/- 5.5%). The effect of lactate was stereospecific because microinjections of the isomer D-lactate (0.5 mol/l, pH 2) did not affect the arteriolar caliber (P = 0.63). Perfusion of the eye with the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor indomethacin, through cannulization of the sublingual artery, caused a generalized reversible arteriolar vasoconstriction of 51 +/- 9.8% but did not inhibit the segmental vasodilator effect of locally microinjected L-lactate. CONCLUSIONS: It is known that acute hypoxia in the isolated retina causes an increase in lactate production. In the intact eye, there is a retinal vasodilation, which is not inhibited by indomethacin. Hence, it was concluded that retinal, but not blood, lactate is a possible mediator of the acute hypoxia-induced vasodilation.

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