July 1992
Volume 33, Issue 8
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Articles  |   July 1992
Defective processing of motion-defined form in the fellow eye of patients with unilateral amblyopia.
Author Affiliations
  • D E Giaschi
    Department of Ophthalmology, Toronto Hospital, University of Toronto, Canada.
  • D Regan
    Department of Ophthalmology, Toronto Hospital, University of Toronto, Canada.
  • S P Kraft
    Department of Ophthalmology, Toronto Hospital, University of Toronto, Canada.
  • X H Hong
    Department of Ophthalmology, Toronto Hospital, University of Toronto, Canada.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 1992, Vol.33, 2483-2489. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      D E Giaschi, D Regan, S P Kraft, X H Hong; Defective processing of motion-defined form in the fellow eye of patients with unilateral amblyopia.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1992;33(8):2483-2489.

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Abstract

The following three measurements were made on a group of 20 pediatric and 5 adult patients with unilateral amblyopia: (1) speed threshold for recognizing motion-defined dotted letters; (2) recognition acuity for isolated solid letters of 4% contrast; and (3) Snellen line acuity for high-contrast letters. Normal limits were established with a group of 30 pediatric and 10 adult control subjects. The main finding was that, in amblyopic children, a high percentage (83%, 15 of 18) of fellow eyes showed a degraded ability to recognize motion-defined letters, even though Snellen acuity and 4% letter acuity were normal for age. The fellow eyes of all nine patients with strabismic amblyopia showed this pattern of loss, as did four of six fellow eyes of patients with anisometropic amblyopia and two of three fellow eyes of patients with anisometropic plus strabismic amblyopia. Only two clinically unaffected eyes were normal for motion-defined letters. These eyes belonged to patients with anisometropic amblyopia. Eighteen of the 19 previously amblyopic eyes tested were abnormal for motion-defined letters even though Snellen acuity was within normal limits for 6 of these eyes. In adults, only one of five fellow eyes failed the motion-defined letter test. It was concluded that the degradation of form perception associated with amblyopia can be different for luminance-defined and motion-defined form and that defective processing of motion-defined form is common in the fellow eyes of children with unilateral amblyopia.

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