July 1992
Volume 33, Issue 8
Free
Articles  |   July 1992
The primary position of the eyes, the resetting saccade, and the transverse visual head plane. Head movements around the cervical joints.
Author Affiliations
  • R S Jampel
    Kresge Eye Institute, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48201.
  • D X Shi
    Kresge Eye Institute, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48201.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 1992, Vol.33, 2501-2510. doi:
  • Views
  • PDF
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      R S Jampel, D X Shi; The primary position of the eyes, the resetting saccade, and the transverse visual head plane. Head movements around the cervical joints.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1992;33(8):2501-2510.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Photographic and video analyses show that the primary position of the eyes is a natural constant position in alert normal humans, and the eyes are automatically saccadically reset to this position from any displacement of the visual line. The primary position is not dependent on fixation, the fusion reflex, gravity, or the head position. The primary position is defined anatomically by head and eye planes and lines that are localized by photography, magnetic resonance imaging, and x-rays of the head and neck. The eyes are in the primary position when the principal (horizontal) retinal plane is coplanar with the transverse visual head (brain) plane (TVHP), and the equatorial plane of the eye is coplanar with a fixed orbital plane (Listing's plane). Evidence is presented to indicate an active neurologic basis for the primary position instead of passive mechanical forces. A different understanding of the primary position and the conception of the TVHP may be valuable in analyzing oculomotor defects.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×