May 1993
Volume 34, Issue 6
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Articles  |   May 1993
Lens regeneration in New Zealand albino rabbits after endocapsular cataract extraction.
Author Affiliations
  • A Gwon
    Allergen Pharmaceutical, Irvine, CA 92713-9534.
  • L Gruber
    Allergen Pharmaceutical, Irvine, CA 92713-9534.
  • C Mantras
    Allergen Pharmaceutical, Irvine, CA 92713-9534.
  • C Cunanan
    Allergen Pharmaceutical, Irvine, CA 92713-9534.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 1993, Vol.34, 2124-2129. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      A Gwon, L Gruber, C Mantras, C Cunanan; Lens regeneration in New Zealand albino rabbits after endocapsular cataract extraction.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1993;34(6):2124-2129.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To evaluate the regenerative capacity of the adult rabbit lens after removal of a Concanavalin A-induced posterior subcapsular cataract. METHODS: Cataractogenesis was induced by intravitreal injection of Concanavalin A in adult New Zealand albino rabbits. At 7 mo postinjection, the cataracts were removed. Endocapsular lens extraction was performed by phacoemulsification and irrigation/aspiration with Balanced Salt Solution. RESULTS: Postoperatively, lens regeneration was first noted in the Balanced Salt Solution normal lens group at 3 weeks and the Concanavalin A cataract group at 6 weeks. By the 3-mo postoperative examination, lens regrowth, measured by digital image analysis, filled 74.5% of the capsule bag in the Balanced Salt Solution normal lens group and 46.6% in the Concanavalin A cataract group. In the latter group, less lens material was regenerated and at a slower rate than in eyes with extraction of a normal lens. CONCLUSION: This experimental model is the first to show that lens regeneration can occur after removal of cataracts secondary to inflammation.

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