May 1993
Volume 34, Issue 6
Free
Articles  |   May 1993
Senile cataract progression studies using the Lens Opacities Classification System II.
Author Affiliations
  • B V Magno
    Ophthalmic Genetics and Clinical Services Branch, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892.
  • M B Datiles, 3rd
    Ophthalmic Genetics and Clinical Services Branch, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892.
  • S M Lasa
    Ophthalmic Genetics and Clinical Services Branch, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 1993, Vol.34, 2138-2141. doi:
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      B V Magno, M B Datiles, S M Lasa; Senile cataract progression studies using the Lens Opacities Classification System II.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1993;34(6):2138-2141.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To determine cataract progression rates at 6-mo intervals as evaluated using the Lens Opacities Classification System II (LOCS II). METHODS: Idiopathic age-related cataracts in both eyes of 50 cataract patients and 17 normal control subjects were graded. The lenses were reexamined at 6 and 12 mo (+/- 2 mo) from baseline to determine rates of change. Progression or regression in patients or control subjects was considered to have occurred at the 6-mo examination if a one or more step change in the LOCS II grading was noted in at least one eye at 6 mo and maintained at the 12-mo visit. RESULTS: Six months from baseline, 38% of patients' conditions worsened in the nuclear area, 34% of patients' conditions worsened in the cortical region, and 8% of patients' conditions worsened in the posterior subcapsular region. Regression rates were 4% in each region. The percentages of patients progressing in the nuclear and cortical regions were significantly greater than the corresponding regression rates (P < .001). Greater progression was noted in the nuclear (P = .06) and posterior subcapsular (P < .01) regions in patients with early opacities (LOCS + 1/+2) as compared to patients with no opacities initially in the same lenticular areas. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that the LOCS II is capable of detecting changes in lens opacities in a relatively short period of time among persons with early to moderate opacities.

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