January 1996
Volume 37, Issue 1
Free
Articles  |   January 1996
Interobserver reliability of the Teller Acuity Card procedure in pediatric patients.
Author Affiliations
  • L M Getz
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.
  • V Dobson
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.
  • B Luna
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.
  • C Mash
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science January 1996, Vol.37, 180-187. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      L M Getz, V Dobson, B Luna, C Mash; Interobserver reliability of the Teller Acuity Card procedure in pediatric patients.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1996;37(1):180-187.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To compare interobserver agreement for Teller Acuity Card estimates of grating acuity between children with ocular or neurologic abnormalities, or both, and age-matched healthy preterm children. METHODS: Subjects were 57 children, 3 to 38 months of age, who were referred for visual assessment because of diagnosed or suspected visual impairment (clinical group), and 57 healthy preterm children with no known visual or neurologic abnormalities (control group), each of whom was matched to a clinical subject, based on corrected age at the time of testing, and type of testing (monocular or binocular). Each child's grating acuity was tested by two independent observers. RESULTS: Interobserver agreement of 1 octave or better was found in 91% of the monocular and 96% of the binocular clinical test-retest comparisons and in 95% of the monocular and 96% of the binocular control comparisons. For estimates of interocular acuity difference, interobserver agreement of 1 octave or better was found in 88% of clinical subjects and 88% of control subjects. Average test time was significantly longer in the clinical group (4.1 minutes [SD = 1.9] for monocular and 3.6 minutes [SD = 1.9] for binocular tests) than in the control group (2.5 minutes [SD = 0.9] for monocular and 2.4 minutes [SD = 0.6] for binocular tests), suggesting that children in the clinical group were more difficult to test. CONCLUSIONS: Teller Acuity Card testing conducted by experienced testers is as reliable in children with mild to severe ocular or neurologic abnormalities as it is in healthy children, even though children with abnormalities may be more difficult to test.

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