January 1996
Volume 37, Issue 1
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Articles  |   January 1996
Vitamin E, retinyl palmitate, and protein in rhesus monkey retina and retinal pigment epithelium-choroid.
Author Affiliations
  • D V Crabtree
    Schepens Eye Research Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
  • A J Adler
    Schepens Eye Research Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
  • D M Snodderly
    Schepens Eye Research Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science January 1996, Vol.37, 47-60. doi:
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      D V Crabtree, A J Adler, D M Snodderly; Vitamin E, retinyl palmitate, and protein in rhesus monkey retina and retinal pigment epithelium-choroid.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1996;37(1):47-60.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To measure the amounts of vitamin E, retinyl palmitate, and protein in the primate retina and its supporting tissues-the retinal pigment epithelium and choroid. To compare the amounts and concentrations of these materials in the central retina with those in the peripheral retina and to compare the concentration of vitamin E in the retina with that in plasma. Finally, to compare these results in rhesus monkey with existing measurements in humans. METHODS: Ocular tissues from rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were extracted with a two-phase solvent system. Components in the extract were separated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography. Two detectors in series monitored the effluent: Vitamin E was quantified with an internal standard and fluorescence detection, whereas retinyl palmitate was quantified with an external standard and ultraviolet light detection. RESULTS: Amounts of vitamin E, retinyl palmitate, and protein in tissues from rhesus monkey compared reasonably well with those reported for humans. The content of vitamin E in the peripheral neural retina was moderately correlated with its protein content and, to a greater extent, with the concentration of vitamin E in the plasma; however, the content of vitamin E in the central neural retina correlated only with the amount of protein in the central neural retina. CONCLUSIONS: These results are consistent with rhesus monkey as a model for the use of vitamin E by human ocular tissues. The amount of vitamin E in the central neural retina appears to be more closely regulated than the amount of vitamin E in the peripheral neural retina.

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