June 1996
Volume 37, Issue 7
Free
Articles  |   June 1996
In vivo quantitation of peroxides in the vitreous humor by fluorophotometry.
Author Affiliations
  • H Taguchi
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Kyoto University, Faculty of Medicine, Japan.
  • Y Ogura
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Kyoto University, Faculty of Medicine, Japan.
  • T Takanashi
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Kyoto University, Faculty of Medicine, Japan.
  • M Hashizoe
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Kyoto University, Faculty of Medicine, Japan.
  • Y Honda
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Kyoto University, Faculty of Medicine, Japan.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 1996, Vol.37, 1444-1450. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      H Taguchi, Y Ogura, T Takanashi, M Hashizoe, Y Honda; In vivo quantitation of peroxides in the vitreous humor by fluorophotometry.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1996;37(7):1444-1450.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To detect intravitreal peroxides in vivo by a new fluorophotometric method with a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-sensitive fluorescent dye. METHODS: The authors used a 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin (DCFH) assay to measure oxidative status in the rabbit vitreous. In the presence of H2O2 and lipid hydroperoxides, nonfluorescent DCFH in the vitreous is oxidized to highly fluorescent 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF; excitation, 495 nm; emission, 520 nm) that is detectable by fluorophotometry. Reactions of DCFH with various concentrations of H2O2 were investigated in vitro and in vivo. An inhibitory effect of catalase also was monitored. Vitreous fluorophotometry with DCFH was performed immediately and at 3, 7, and 28 days after constant light exposure to the retina (1800 lux, 24 hours) as an oxidative stress. RESULTS: In vitro study revealed that H2O2 oxidized DCFH to DCF in a dose-dependent manner, ranging from 0.1 to 100 mmol/1 in concentration. Catalase inhibited DCF production. Vitreous fluorophotometry demonstrated that H2O2 oxidized DCFH to DCF in vivo in a dose-dependent manner, ranging from 0.06 to 60 mmol/1 in concentration. DCF production in the vitreous significantly increased immediately (P = 0.03) and at 3 days (P = 0.01) and 7 days (P = 0.01) after light exposure, and it returned to the pretreatment level by day 28. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that this fluorophotometric method quantitatively can detect intravitreal peroxides in vivo. This method will be helpful to study the oxidative status in some experimental pathologic conditions.

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