May 1996
Volume 37, Issue 6
Free
Articles  |   May 1996
Continuous measurement of intraocular pressure in rabbits by telemetry.
Author Affiliations
  • J W McLaren
    Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA.
  • R F Brubaker
    Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA.
  • J S FitzSimon
    Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 1996, Vol.37, 966-975. doi:
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      J W McLaren, R F Brubaker, J S FitzSimon; Continuous measurement of intraocular pressure in rabbits by telemetry.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1996;37(6):966-975.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: Intraocular pressure (IOP) is dynamic and can be influenced by the use of tonometers. The authors developed a technique to implant a telemetric pressure transducer to measure IOP continuously in unrestrained rabbits. METHODS: A commercial telemetric pressure transducer was implanted subcutaneously on the dorsal neck, between the scapulae, of pigmented rabbits. A fluid-filled catheter that conducts pressure to the transducer was routed to the orbit subcutaneously and implanted in the anterior chamber through a limbal opening. The transducer measured pressure and broadcast this information by amplitude modulation radio to a receiver in the animal's cage. Data were recorded at a rate of 50 or 100 samples per second for 60 seconds to study transient changes in IOP to tonometry, or for 15 seconds every 2.5 minutes to study circadian behavior of IOP. RESULTS: Intraocular pressure was recorded from seven rabbits for 180 to 370 days. Within 3 to 8 days of implant surgery, IOP began to follow a circadian rhythm: IOP decreased after room lights were turned on at 00:00 CT and increased after they were turned off at 12:00 CT. (The term CT refers to circadian time and begins at 00:00 CT when lights are turned on.) The maximum difference in IOP between light and dark phases ranged from 6.4 mm Hg to 16.6 mm Hg. When the lighting cycle was advanced by 6 hours, the time of nocturnal rise in IOP also advanced, but it did so gradually over 10 to 14 days. CONCLUSIONS: The implanted pressure transducer provides a convenient, preinvasive method to measure and study IOP in unrestrained experimental animals. This technique will be used to study circadian variations in IOP, the effects of environmental stimuli, and the oculohypotensive effects of therapeutic agents.

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