March 1998
Volume 39, Issue 3
Free
Articles  |   March 1998
Recording multifocal electroretinogram on and off responses in humans.
Author Affiliations
  • M Kondo
    Department of Ophthalmology, Nagoya University School of Medicine, Japan.
  • Y Miyake
    Department of Ophthalmology, Nagoya University School of Medicine, Japan.
  • M Horiguchi
    Department of Ophthalmology, Nagoya University School of Medicine, Japan.
  • S Suzuki
    Department of Ophthalmology, Nagoya University School of Medicine, Japan.
  • A Tanikawa
    Department of Ophthalmology, Nagoya University School of Medicine, Japan.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science March 1998, Vol.39, 574-580. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      M Kondo, Y Miyake, M Horiguchi, S Suzuki, A Tanikawa; Recording multifocal electroretinogram on and off responses in humans.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1998;39(3):574-580.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To record the on and off responses of the multifocal photopic electroretinogram (ERG) from the human retina and to explore how each ERG component (a-, b-, and d-waves) changes at different retinal eccentricities. METHODS: Multifocal ERGs were recorded with the visual evoked response imaging system. Sixty-one densely packed stimulus elements were square wave-modulated between stimulus on and stimulus off, according to a binary m-sequence at a rate of 4.7 Hz under a constant background illumination. The ERGs were recorded with a bipolar Burian-Allen bipolar contact lens electrode from five normal subjects. Response densities (amplitude per retinal area) were calculated for five different eccentric rings. RESULTS: The response densities for all components (a-, b-, and d-waves) decreased with increasing retinal eccentricities. The ratio of the d-wave to b-wave amplitudes was minimal in the central retina and increased toward the periphery. The ratio of a-wave to b-wave amplitudes also increased toward the peripheral retina. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that the on and off responses of the human cone ERGs have different spatial distributions across the human retina, and they suggest a change in the photopic retinal circuitry with increasing retinal eccentricities.

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