April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
Changes in IOP with Body Position Using Continuous Bilateral IOP Telemetry
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Daniel C Turner
    Ophthalmology, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, Birmingham, AL
  • Lisa A Hethcox
    Ophthalmology, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, Birmingham, AL
  • Christopher A Girkin
    Ophthalmology, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, Birmingham, AL
  • J Crawford C Downs
    Ophthalmology, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, Birmingham, AL
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Daniel Turner, None; Lisa Hethcox, None; Christopher Girkin, None; J Crawford Downs, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 116. doi:https://doi.org/
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    • Get Citation

      Daniel C Turner, Lisa A Hethcox, Christopher A Girkin, J Crawford C Downs; Changes in IOP with Body Position Using Continuous Bilateral IOP Telemetry. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):116. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

To study the effect of body position on IOP in nonhuman primates (NHPs) using continuous bilateral IOP telemetry.

 
Methods
 

We have developed and validated an implantable telemetry system that wirelessly records 500 measurements of IOP per second for up to 2-1/2 years (IOVS 52(10):7365-75). Using an enhanced version of this system, continuous bilateral IOP, bilateral electro-oculogram (EOG), and aortic blood pressure were recorded at seven different body positions while anesthetized (ketamine/dexdomitor) in two different sessions 2 weeks apart in 3 young adult male rhesus macaques (NHP) aged 3-6 years old. IOPs were recorded continuously while the NHPs were in the upright seated position, standing up, supine, lying on the right shoulder in the recumbent position, lying on left shoulder in the recumbent position, and lying with head facing forward in the prone position. Measurements were taken for 1.5 minutes in each position before returning to a baseline supine position until IOP stabilized. After changing body position, IOP was averaged for 1 minute after it reached steady-state, and compared to the baseline IOP in the supine position.

 
Results
 

Baseline IOP was determined by averaging six recordings of 1 minute in the supine position. As seen in the Table, IOPs changed most in the inverted head-down position (increase of 8.4 mmHg over baseline). In the lateral recumbent positions, the eye at higher elevation (i.e. OS while lying in the right lateral recumbent position) had an average decrease of 2.3 mmHg, while the lower elevation eye averaged a decrease of only 0.1 mmHg. The prone position revealed an average decrease of 2.9 mmHg compared to baseline, while in the seated upright position and standing decreased 3.3 and 3.2 mmHg respectively. IOP reached steady-state values within 15 seconds after positional change.

 
Conclusions
 

Body orientation has a significant effect on IOP in the NHP and IOP changes occurred very rapidly after positional change.

 
 
Table: Average IOP changes with body position compared to baseline supine position.
 
Table: Average IOP changes with body position compared to baseline supine position.
 
Keywords: 568 intraocular pressure  
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