April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
Environmental noise in cataract surgery
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carmela Carnevale
    Ophthalmology, University of Rome "La Sapienza", Rome, Italy
  • Giuseppe Messano
    Public Health and Infective Disease, University of Rome "La Sapienza", Rome, Italy
  • Emanuele Gerace
    Ophthalmology, University of Rome "La Sapienza", Rome, Italy
  • Stefano Petti
    Public Health and Infective Disease, University of Rome "La Sapienza", Rome, Italy
  • Enzo M Vingolo
    Ophthalmology, University of Rome "La Sapienza", Rome, Italy
  • Roberto Grenga
    Ophthalmology, University of Rome "La Sapienza", Rome, Italy
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Carmela Carnevale, None; Giuseppe Messano, None; Emanuele Gerace, None; Stefano Petti, None; Enzo Vingolo, None; Roberto Grenga, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 2535. doi:https://doi.org/
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    • Get Citation

      Carmela Carnevale, Giuseppe Messano, Emanuele Gerace, Stefano Petti, Enzo M Vingolo, Roberto Grenga; Environmental noise in cataract surgery. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):2535. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the environmental noise (EN) produced by the equipment during cataract surgery. Daily exposure for 8 h to noise levels of 85 dB(A) (measure system which focuses on the potential hearing loss) is associated with permanent hearing loss. The environmental noise is a source of concern among ophthalmologists, who sometimes feel to suffer by hearing impairment or annoyance.

Methods: During a surgical session performed at the Department of Ophthalmology (Sapienza University of Rome) ten cataract surgery interventions were made by three different ophthalmologists. For each intervention the mean EN level and the noise peak we measured using a sound level meter placed close to the surgeon. The mean values, with 95% confidence intervals (95CI) of these parameters were assessed.

Results: The mean duration of each intervention was 10’40” (range, 6’7”-20’32”). The mean EN was 67.39 dB(A) (95CI, 64.11-70.67) and the peak was 101.57 dB(A) (95CI, 97.92-105.22). These parameters were not associated with the duration of the intervention.

Conclusions: According to WHO, EN levels of 55 dB(A) in the workplace are associated with annoyance, irritation and may be detrimental for performance. Levels >65 dB(A) increase the risk for cardio-vascular diseases. The results of this pilot study, if will be confirmed by the large sample-sized study, suggest that EN during cataract surgery could be detrimental for health among ophthalmologists.

Keywords: 445 cataract • 465 clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: systems/equipment/techniques  
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