April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
Efficacy and Safety of Topical New Sodium Pump Inhibitor (NSPI) in Reducing Intraocular Pressure in a Canine Model
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jonathan B Jacobs
    Daroff-Dell'Osso Ocular Motility Lab, Cleveland VA Med Ctr, Cleveland, OH
    Neurology (School of Med) and Biomedical Engr, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
  • Richard W Hertle
    Ophthalmology, Children’s Hospital Medical Center of Akron, Akron, OH
    Ophthalmology, SUMMA Medical Center, Akron, OH
  • Jeffrey Dunmire
    Ophthalmology, SUMMA Medical Center, Akron, OH
  • Louis F Dell'Osso
    Daroff-Dell'Osso Ocular Motility Lab, Cleveland VA Med Ctr, Cleveland, OH
    Neurology (School of Med) and Biomedical Engr, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
  • Lauren A Dalvin
    Graduate Medical Education, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
  • Dongsheng Yang
    Ophthalmology, Children’s Hospital Medical Center of Akron, Akron, OH
  • Michelle Evano-Chapman
    Ophthalmology, SUMMA Medical Center, Akron, OH
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Jonathan Jacobs, None; Richard Hertle, US FDA (P), Vision of Children (F); Jeffrey Dunmire, None; Louis Dell'Osso, None; Lauren Dalvin, None; Dongsheng Yang, None; Michelle Evano-Chapman, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 2889. doi:https://doi.org/
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Jonathan B Jacobs, Richard W Hertle, Jeffrey Dunmire, Louis F Dell'Osso, Lauren A Dalvin, Dongsheng Yang, Michelle Evano-Chapman; Efficacy and Safety of Topical New Sodium Pump Inhibitor (NSPI) in Reducing Intraocular Pressure in a Canine Model. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):2889. doi: https://doi.org/.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract
 
Purpose
 

To determine the ocular and systemic safety and efficacy of a new topical medication in canines to lower intraocular pressure. This additional effect was discovered during a study of an NSPI as a treatment for infantile nystagmus syndrome.

 
Methods
 

Following in vitro safety testing and IUCAC approval, we applied increasing concentrations of topical NSPI drops (0.002% to 0.7%) in two canines with normal intraocular pressures. Drops were applied routinely in both animals. We collected ophthalmic data including: rebound tonometry (ICARER), indirect ophthalmoscopic video fundus examination, and slit lamp and external inspection for surface and intraocular toxicity. We monitored for systemic toxicity with urine analysis and venous blood sampling for hematology, serum chemistries and liver function tests.

 
Results
 

At the 0.7% concentration dose of NSPI there was minimal, reversible, conjunctival hyperemia, with no other ocular or systemic toxicity. At the 0.6% dose there was a sustained decrease in IOP of 40-60%. Pressure returned to—or near—normal by the following day, though after prolonged administration the rebound lessened.

 
Conclusions
 

Canines serve as an excellent model for human glaucoma. They share similar IOP, anterior segment anatomy and aqueous production, metabolism and egress physiology. We postulate an immediate decrease in aqueous production as the likely mechanism of the NSPI. This unique class of biologically acting agents may act directly on non-pigmented ciliary epithelial metabolism. Our study suggests that a new, potent, safe class of pharmacological agents has potential for topical treatment of human glaucoma.

 
 
OD and OS IOPS vs Date of Administration (Times of doses and Concentration of doses)
 
OD and OS IOPS vs Date of Administration (Times of doses and Concentration of doses)
 
Keywords: 568 intraocular pressure • 503 drug toxicity/drug effects • 455 ciliary body  
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×