April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
Efficacy of second-course ophthalmic artery chemosurgery for retinoblastoma
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jasmine H Francis
    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY
  • Y. P Gobin
    Weill-Cornell Medical College, New York Presbyterian, New York, NY
  • Brian Marr
    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY
    Weill-Cornell Medical College, New York Presbyterian, New York, NY
  • Irwin Tendler
    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY
    Weill-Cornell Medical College, New York Presbyterian, New York, NY
  • Scott E Brodie
    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY
    Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY
  • David H Abramson
    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY
    Weill-Cornell Medical College, New York Presbyterian, New York, NY
  • Ira J Dunkel
    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY
    Weill-Cornell Medical College, New York Presbyterian, New York, NY
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Jasmine Francis, None; Y. Gobin, None; Brian Marr, None; Irwin Tendler, None; Scott Brodie, None; David Abramson, None; Ira Dunkel, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 3091. doi:https://doi.org/
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      Jasmine H Francis, Y. P Gobin, Brian Marr, Irwin Tendler, Scott E Brodie, David H Abramson, Ira J Dunkel; Efficacy of second-course ophthalmic artery chemosurgery for retinoblastoma. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):3091. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of second-course ophthalmic artery chemosurgery (OAC) following progression of disease after completing initially successful ophthalmic artery chemosurgery for retinoblastoma.

Methods: Single-arm, retrospective study of 31 eyes in 32 patients treated with second-course OAC at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between May 2006 and July 2013, with a median 34 months follow-up. The study included patients who underwent a successful course of IA chemotherapy, with a minimum of 2 months of progression-free follow-up at monthly examinations, but who subsequently required additional OAC for recurrent tumor. Outcome measurements included progression free survival and ocular survival. Kaplan Meier survival estimates were generated and the Mantel-Cox test was used to compare curves.

Results: Eyes requiring second-line OAC had initially received a mean of 3.1 OAC infusions. They developed progression of disease and necessity for second-course OAC at a mean of 8.7 mos following initial OAC. The 2-year Kaplan-Meier ocular survival and progression free survival estimates following second-course OAC were 80.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 58.5-91.3%) and 47.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 27.8-64.0%), respectively. Vitreous seeds were present in 17 (53%) of eyes requiring second-course OAC and were significantly associated with progression of disease following second-course OAC (p=0.01). Neither prior treatment status, age at initial OAC, addition of new drug, or increasing number of infusions during second-course OAC was significantly associated with progression free survival.

Conclusions: Retinoblastoma eyes requiring second-course OAC following initial OAC treatment have good salvage rates. However, these eyes often require additional (third or fourth-course) OAC or other treatment modalities due to progression of disease after second-line OAC, particularly if vitreous seeds are present at the time of initial OAC failure.

Keywords: 703 retinoblastoma • 744 tumors • 462 clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: outcomes/complications  
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